Rwanda genocide suspect Fulgence Kayishema appears in South African court.

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Fulgence Kayishema, a former Rwandan police officer accused of killing 2,000 Tutsis seeking refuge in a church during the 1994 genocide, appeared briefly in a South African court on Friday and was remanded.

Kayishema faces five South African charges, including two for fraud, according to a charge sheet seen

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) alleges he falsely claimed Burundian nationality and used a false name when applying for asylum and refugee status in South Africa.

Cape Town Magistrates’ Court adjourned the case to June 2 without asking Kayishema to plead.

Kayishema was asked by a journalist if he had anything to say to the 1994 genocide victims as he was brought up from the dock: “What I can say? “We are sorry to hear what happened,” he said.

Kayishema was arrested on a Paarl grape farm on Wednesday after 20 years on the run.

Since 2001, when the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda indicted him for genocide for destroying the Nyange Catholic Church in Kibuye Prefecture, he has been a fugitive.

Rwanda’s genocide, orchestrated by an extremist Hutu regime and meticulously carried out by local officials and ordinary citizens in the rigidly hierarchical society, killed 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and Hutu moderates.

Kayishema has a $5 million reward on the U.S. State Department’s Rewards for Justice Program wanted list.

Kayishema was represented in court on Friday and agreed to English proceedings without a translator.

Masked police with automatic weapons and bulletproof vests patrolled the courtroom.

Kayishema wore a blue raincoat, black pants, and black leather boots. He was clean-shaven and carried a bible and a blue dedication book with “Jesus First” on the cover.

Kayishema will await extradition to Rwanda at Cape Town’s Pollsmoor Prison.

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